FAQs

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Frequently Asked Questions

What files are acceptable to produce high quality products?

Print-ready Documents:

+ High resolution CMYK PDF, at a minimum of 300 DPI (dots per square inch)
When providing print-ready files that have unique folds or a custom dieline, provide a separate PDF indicating the correct placement.

+ Sufficient bleed, at a minimum of .125”
Bleed
refers to objects that extend beyond the edge of the printed page. Once a job has been printed, the press sheets need to be folded, bound and trimmed. For each of these finishing steps, there is a certain margin of error. Bleed makes it easier to avoid issues.

+ Packaged InDesign File

 How to Package an InDesign File:

  • While the InDesign document is open, go to the top menu, and click on “File” to open that drop down menu. Choose “Package” and follow the prompts. 
  • When you “package” an InDesign file, it will create a folder with a copy of the InDesign document, a sub folder for “Fonts” and another sub folder with “Links.”
  • Once correctly packaged, this folder may be too large to email, so it will need to uploaded to the Presstige Printing website. Before uploading to our site, you MUST compress/zip the main folder.
  • Please click on the “File Upload” tab in the top right hand corner of the Presstige Printing website and follow the directions found on that page. 

Images:

+ High resolution TIFF, PSD or JPEG, at a minimum of 300 DPI (dots per square inch)
Scaling up a lower resolution file will result in a loss of quality.


Logos:

+ Vector EPS file saved from Adobe Illustrator
A vector graphic is resolution-independent, allowing it to be scaled to any size and printed on any output device at any resolution without losing its detail or clarity.

+ Convert all text to outlines to avoid potential font problems.

How to Convert Text to Outlines in an Illustrator File:

  • While the Illustrator document is open, go to the top menu, and click on “Select” to open that drop down menu. Choose “All.”
  • Go back to the top menu, and click on “Type” to open that drop down menu. Choose “Create Outlines.”
How do I correctly upload files to the Presstige Printing website?

Please click on the “File Upload” tab in the top right hand corner of the Presstige Printing website and follow the directions found on that page. The instructions are also listed below for your convenience.

Uploading A Single File:
1.) Name the folder appropriately. It is imperative that you name the file appropriately so we can identify which file is yours! Use the name of your company and the type of project. (Example: CommunitySchoolPoster)

2.) Go to http://presstigeprinting.com/file-upload/

3.) Upload the zipped folder to our site by dragging and dropping it from your computer onto the upload page or use the “Select the Folder” option.


Uploading Multiple Files:
1.) Create a folder on your computer.

2.) Name the folder appropriately. It is imperative that you name the file appropriately so we can identify which file is yours! Use the name of your company and the type of project. (Example: CommunitySchoolPoster)

3.) Copy all of the content you would like to share with Presstige Printing into that folder.

4.) Zip that folder. Zipping the folder is an important step, otherwise the uploading process will expand the folder and separate all of your files on our internal ftp server.

On a Mac: Hold down Control and click on the folder and choose “Compress…”

On a PC: Right click on the folder and choose “Send to: Compressed (Zipped folder)”

5.) Go to http://presstigeprinting.com/file-upload/

6.) Upload this zipped folder to our site by dragging and dropping it from your computer onto the upload page or use the “Select the Folder” option.

What are the physical standards for commercial letters and postcards?
Letter/PC Standards

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What are the guidelines when designing mail for automated processing?
Automation Mail Guide

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What is the correct way to create a mailing indicia?
Indicias

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What are standard envelope sizes?

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What is the difference between trim line, live area and bleed?

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Trim Line: The trim line indicates the final, finished size of the piece.

Live Area: The live area is the safe zone for any important information.
For example, if a publication’s trim size is 8.25″ × 10.25″, the live area would be 7.75″ × 9.75″. Once a job has been printed, the press sheets need to be folded, bound and trimmed. For each of these finishing steps, there is a certain margin of error. Designing within the live area makes it easier to avoid issues.

Bleed: The minimum bleed you need to provide for a printed piece is 0.125″ (1/8″).
If you are working with an image in Photoshop and you’re placing it into InDesign for print preparation, keep in mind the additional area you need to use for the bleed.

Crop Marks: Crop marks indicate the edges of the trim size. This is where the paper will be cut.

 

What is the difference between RGB, CMYK and Spot/Pantone colors?
Colors

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RGB: The RGB (red, green, blue) color profile is used exclusively in digital design, as it represents the same colors used in computer screens, televisions and mobile devices. It is NOT used in print.

CMYK: The CMYK color profile is also referred to as four-color process due to the fact that it utilizes four different colored inks to create an array of different hues during the printing process: cyan, magenta, yellow and black (key).

Spot/Pantone®/PMS: PMS stands for Pantone Matching System, which is a universal color matching system used primarily in printing. Unlike RGB and CMYK, PMS spot colors are created with pre-mixed ink, resulting in the most consistent color possible.

Browse the Pantone Color Finder to identify the numbered code for a specific spot ink color. This ensures an accurate color match every time and eliminates discrepancies between your digital design and the final, printed product.